Stephen Crabb talks to David Cornock

Autumn/Winter 2015

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Contents

Crabb’s Journey

David Cornock talks to the Welsh Secretary about his route from Pembrokeshire to Parliament, his view on the word “Principality” and what the future may hold.

Jez we will? 

Roger Scully considers what the recent polling might tell us about “the Corbyn effect” on politics in Wales.

Public service broadcasting-who needs it now? 

As the IWA launches its Wales Media Audit at an event in Cardiff on November 11th, Glyn Mathias considers where broadcasting in Wales may be heading.

A “National” Health Service?

Shane Doheny looks at the different paths being followed by the NHS in England and Wales.

Bigger isn’t always better

Simon Parker argues for “small” not to be forgotten within the “big” of local government organisation.

Dealing with Dementia

Beti George gave this year’s IWA Eisteddfod Lecture, Taclo Dementia: Allwn ni ddim ffordio peidio- Tackling Dementia: we can’t afford not to; here she outlines the challenges from her perspective as her husband’s carer.

IWA Energy Roundtable

In June the IWA convened a roundtable to discuss our proposal to make Wales a net exporter of renewable energy. The seminar, sponsored by RWE Innology UK, brought together leading figures from politics, academia and industry: Tom Bodden reports.

Competitiveness and policy autonomy: What can Wales learn from the Basque Country

James Wilson outlines what Wales could learn from one of Europe’s success stories.

The Centre-Periphery Game

David Anderson wonders how long Wales will be content at the periphery of BBC arts and culture coverage.

The makeup of the next Assembly

Gareth Hughes profiles the seats to watch at the 2016 Assembly elections.

The manifesto Makers

Behind closed doors, it’s the busiest time of the political year; manifesto makers are meeting to decide on policy proposals and parties are putting together their election strategies. Liz Silversmith gives an insight.

The One-And-A-Half-Party state

Adam Price gives a pre-election rallying cry that reverberates far beyone the confines of his own party.

A New Union Mentality

Leighton Andrews makes an impassioned plea for a constitutional convention.

Return of the Native

David Marquand revisits his Welsh roots and celebrates having come home to an unsettled political community.

Putting the patient experience first

Jess Blair outlines the findings of the IWA’s Let’s talk cancer project.

Can Wales get it’s “fair share” of research funding?

Peter W Halligan

Student Finance: time for a rethink?

Ken Richards challenges the anomalies, inconsistencies and costliness of the student finance system and outlines areas for potential reform.

Zombie Nation: Wales Resuscitated, By Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Dylan Moore meets classical singer and facilitator Richard Parry, and catches a glimpse of a society that could yet be.

The Bigger Picture: Lessons for the Early Years

Mary Powell-Chandler and Chris Taylor look beyond Donaldson for solutions to the early years attainment gap.

A Justice for Wales

Paul Silk makes the case for a Welsh Justice on the Supreme Court.

A colonial fantasy

Jasmine Donahaye examines nineteenth-century plans to establish a Welsh colony in Palestine.

The trouble with civil society in Wales

Rebecca Rumbul calls for greater distance between government in Wales and the third sector.

The South American Connection

Jon Gower looks back on another year of cultural commemoration.

Nudging people out of their cars

Jane Lorimer outlines the success of a programme providing people with transport choices.

Good Food: A quiet revolution 

Kevin Morgan makes the case for Wales to actively embrace the good food movement.

Culture Section Review

Local lads, distant vistas

Toby Thacker

A labour of love

Dylan Moore

An unstated rebuke

Aled Eirug

Gifts indeed

Susie Wild

Short stories showcase

Lewis Davies

An accomplished debut

John Lavin

Last word

#RefugeesWelcome

Dylan Moore

 

 

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